Monthly Archives: April 2013

Tonight Only: Ancient Language Learning Method Finally Revealed

  You’ve been given fool-proof methods, total immersion package holidays, smartphone apps and programmed interval revisions. You’ve signed on crash courses and dragged your laptop through endless language-learning hangouts. Tonight I’m sharing a secret method with you – old, forgotten, and bang-on effective. Hi – thanks for reading this. All three of my eBooks will […]

The Gap and the Work: Disappointment and Taste in Learning Foreign Languages

  I’ve admired and enjoyed the work of Ira Glass for a long time. When I recently heard his thoughts on creativity, my respect for what he does became even bigger – and I got inspired to think about language learning in several new ways. Read (and watch) on for more – and join the […]

3 Unexpected Lessons From 1 Language Teaching Conference

Last year, my first IATEFL conference nearly killed me. This year I did it again. April is truly the cruelest of months for English teachers. If you want to know what I learned at IATEFL in Liverpool, read on: I’m hoping to make this one useful for all languages, learners and teachers alike. Unexpected, but […]

Research vs. response: 2 language learning modes & how to use them better

Don’t let the title put you off. This post is actually about something that happens every day for every language learner. And getting some answers to the questions listed here will improve the way you teach, learn or use foreign languages. Let’s get started: it all begins in a portrait gallery. Hi – thanks for […]

My Language Learning Scrapbook: Introducing bravelearning Evernote Openbook

Newsletter subscribers have tried it out already. Now it’s your turn. I’ve prepared a new way of sharing foreign language news and resources with you. It’s here, for free, forever. Read on and see why I’m so glad this happened! Hi – thanks for reading this. All three of my eBooks will now cost you […]

Guerrilla Language Learning Buddy Groups: from Facebook to Captain Planet

  Foreign language study is more people-oriented than other disciplines I know of. So it makes sense that students of one language spend time learning – and teaching – together. How do such language learning communities grow – especially when time, money and resources are crucial? Let’s try to find out. Hi – thanks for […]